Why the 3-D experience is not for everyone

[:en]2 August 2010 (Dubai, UAE): Three-dimensional (3-D) entertainment is now exploding across our cinema and television screens (and even laptop computers) transforming the viewing experience and creating a new wave of entertainment led by block buster movies such as Avatar. However, not everyone can enjoy the 3-D experience. According to the Royal College of Ophthalmology, approximately 2-3 per cent of the general population cannot perceive 3-D images because of the early onset of squint, or an eye problem that develops later in life.
The principle behind 3-D imaging is that we have binocular vision, with two eyes separated by a space of 2-3 inches, explains Dr Chris Canning, Medical Director of Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai: “This separation causes each eye to see the world from a slightly different perspective; when combined, this single image enables us to perceive depth and distance, and to see the world and media content in ‘3-D’. If there are multiple objects in our field of view, we can tell their relative distance. If you look at the world with one eye closed, you can still perceive distance, but your accuracy decreases and you have to rely on other visual cues.”
The brain combines these two images from our eyes into one composite image. “A simple way of testing this is to look at the same object with each eye covered alternately; the image shifts very slightly from eye to eye. In a cinema, the reason we wear 3-D glasses is to feed different images into our eyes.”
The cinema screen actually displays two images, and the glasses cause each image to enter a different eye. At many 3-D venues, the preferred method is to use polarized lenses because they allow color viewing. Two synchronized projectors project two views onto the screen, each with a different polarization. The glasses allow only one of the images into each eye because of the different polarization of the glasses.
“In order to see in 3-D we must have good vision in both eyes and they must work together simultaneously,” adds Dr Canning. “However, for people who have a vision misalignment or those who have severe eye conditions, viewing in 3-D is difficult – if not impossible.”
Some of the severe vision conditions which prevent people seeing in 3-D include amblyopia (lazy eye), strabismus (crossed eye), convergence insufficiency (unable to maintain the correct alignment of the eyes for near targets) and diplopia (double vision).
For those of us lucky enough to be able to enjoy the miracle of 3-D technology, there is still a concern that watching 3-D entertainment can cause side effects, with claims that these can include headaches, dizziness, nausea and eye strain. According to Dr. Chris Canning: “3-D technology is a remarkable concept which has added depth and enjoyment to our viewing experience. Watching 3-D does not damage the eyesight; however, if any symptoms or side effects should appear and persist then it is recommended to visit an eye care professional.”
Contact: Jonathan Walsh/Vanessa Payne
WPR Limited
Dubai
050 4588610
jon@wprme.com

Palestine Children’s Relief Fund refers young patient to Moorfields for expert eye treatment

[:en]16 September 2010 (Dubai, UAE): The Palestine Children’s Relief Fund (PCRF) has referred another young patient to Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai (Moorfields) – the Dubai branch of the Moorfields Eye Hospital in London – for treatment. The young man requires the fitting of artificial eye prosthesis – a procedure which is not possible in Gaza. A Moorfields consultant will perform a comprehensive examination of the patient at the Dubai hospital, and then the artificial eye fitting is expected to proceed quickly after this.
The patient is AbdelHadi Al Jedaili, a 15-year old young man from Albureag, Gaza, who was admitted to a Government Hospital in Gaza in January 2009 with a serious facial injury caused by an explosive device, and which led to the loss of his left eye. As there are no facilities in Gaza to treat such a serious eye injury or to fit an eye prosthesis, the PCRF decided to refer AbdelHadi Al Jedaili’s case to Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai, which has already treated similar cases for the PCRF.
The PCRF UAE Chapter, an international humanitarian relief and medical charity, managed all the logistics to bring AbdelHadi Al Jedaili to the UAE, including visa processing, travel arrangements, and accommodation.
Dr Andrea Sciscio, Consultant Oculoplastic Surgeon at Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai, will conduct the examination of the remaining socket to ensure a comfortable and good fit of the new artificial eye. Paul Geelen, the Ocularist based at Moorfields, will then prepare the artificial eye by carefully moulding and sculpting the prosthesis to fit in the eye socket, and in the final stages by painting the artificial eye, which fits over the remaining eyeball, to match the remaining natural eye perfectly.
Commenting on AbdelHadi Al Jedaili’s case, Dr Andrea Sciscio, Consultant Oculoplastic Surgeon at Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai, said: “The prognosis for AbdelHadi Al Jedaili is good because there appears to be little or no bone damage to his eye socket or to the surrounding tissue; this means that the procedure to fit an artificial eye can go ahead much quicker, as there is no repair work to be done to the face or eye socket, beforehand. We expect him to make a good recovery and be able to live a very normal life after treatment.”
The PCRF welcomed Moorfield’s continuing medical support for the work of PCRF and for AbdelHadi Al Jedaili in particular. Steve Sosebee, President and CEO of the Palestine Children’s Relief Fund, added: On behalf of the PCRF, the PCRF UAE community and our local volunteers, AbdelHadi Al Jedaili and his family, I would like to thank Moorfields for continuing to help the young people in Palestine who cannot get adequate medical care locally.”
The Palestine Children’s Relief Fund is an international NGO which has sent dozens of injured children to Dubai over the past four years for medical care that is not available to them in Palestine. Most of this work has been in cooperation with The Mohammed bin Rashid al Maktoum Humanitarian and Charity Establishment.
www.pcrf.net

Issued on behalf of Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai by WPR.
Media contacts:
Jonathan Walsh/Vanessa Payne
WPR Limited
Dubai
050 4588610
jon@wprme.com

Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai appoints new Medical Director

[:en]1 November 2012 (Dubai, United Arab Emirates): Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai, the first overseas  branch of the world-renowned London eye hospital, has announced the appointment of Dr Clare Roberts MA (Cantab), BM BCh (Oxon), FRCOphth as the hospital’s new Medical Director. Dr Roberts, who trained at Moorfields London, joined the Dubai hospital in 2010 as Consultant Paediatric Ophthalmologist and Strabismus Surgeon. She assumes the role of Medical Director following the return to Moorfields London of Dr Chris Canning, who held the positions of CEO and Medical Director from the establishment of the hospital in 2006. Many of the hospital’s consultants are Moorfields London trained and all are based permanently in the UAE.
Dr Roberts is an experienced consultant ophthalmologist specialising in the assessment and management of children with eye problems, as well as the management of adults with strabismus (crossed eye). She studied medicine both at Cambridge and Oxford University and trained in the UK, acquiring the Fellowship of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists, and completing her subspecialty training in paediatric ophthalmology and strabismus at Moorfields London. Prior to joining Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai, Dr Roberts was a consultant at Imperial College NHS Trust in London, where she managed a large paediatric ophthalmology service including screening and treatment for retinopathy of prematurity. Dr Roberts has a research interest in amblyopia (lazy eye) and retinopathy of prematurity and has published work in paediatric ophthalmology and strabismus.
Commenting on the appointment, Mariano Gonzalez, who was recently appointed Managing Director at Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai, said: “Dr Roberts has been a highly valued member of the team of consultants at Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai since 2010 and will provide an important point of continuity in Dubai. Her credentials are outstanding and she has the Moorfields London training that we value so highly, as well as the world class skills that have benefited the community and especially the children that we treat at the hospital. We congratulate her on this new appointment and have every confidence that she will continue to ably demonstrate the leadership qualities that will be important as the hospital expands and develops in the UAE.”
Issued on behalf of MEHD by WPR.
Media Contact:
Jonathan Walsh
WPR
Dubai
Tel: 050 4588610
Email: jon@wprme.com

MOORFIELDS EYE HOSPITAL DUBAI MARKS FIVE SUCCESSFUL YEARS AND CONFIRMS LONG TERM COMMITMENT AS A PARTNER TO DUBAI HEALTHCARE CITY

[:en]15 October 2012 (Dubai, United Arab Emirates): In the presence of Chairperson of Dubai Healthcare City Authority Her Royal Highness Princess Haya Bint Al Hussein, wife of HH Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai, Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai – the first overseas branch of the world famous London eye hospital – celebrated five successful years of treating patients in Dubai at an event hosted at the hospital and attended by VIPs, senior figures from the healthcare sector, and invited guests.
Founded in 1804, Moorfields Eye Hospital in London has pioneered eye care for more than 200 years. Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai is the first overseas branch and was officially inaugurated in Dubai by HRH Prince Charles, the Prince of Wales, in 2007. The hospital has since treated more than 20,000 patients, many of them from the UAE, as well as from across the region, and played an active role in supporting the community.
On the occasion of the 5th anniversary, Moorfields expressed its gratitude for the support of DHCC and also outlined its own future plans to expand its clinical services within the UAE from the Dubai hospital, with an increasing emphasis on teaching and research.
Speaking at the celebratory event, Mr John Pelly, Chief Executive of Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Trust, said: “We are delighted to share this occasion and to showcase these world class facilities in which Moorfields – and Dubai – can take great pride. Moorfields in the United Kingdom has a reputation and heritage developed over more than 200 years. The principal reason we wanted to come to Dubai was to offer our substantial expertise in eye care – through our world class specialists in London and Dubai – to the people of the United Arab Emirates and beyond but also to learn from this experience. Moorfields Dubai has grown steadily over these last five years and established a reputation for being one of the best eye care service providers in the region. We are very grateful for the active support of Dubai Healthcare City throughout this period and we are committed to being here for the long term, and so look forward to this continued successful collaboration.”
Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai was one of the first international healthcare providers with world-renowned credentials to set up at Dubai Healthcare City (DHCC), the world’s first healthcare free zone, filling a significant gap with much-needed specialized services in ophthalmology, to cater to the UAE population which has a high incidence of diabetes and is prone to eye disease.
Dr Chris Canning, CEO and Medical Director of Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai, added: “Dubai was clearly the best place for our new hospital and DHCC has proved to be the perfect host, attracting some of the world’s leading healthcare service providers and delivering high quality care and services to a growing international patient base. We have also played a role in supporting DHCC’s medical tourism development, treating patients from over 140 countries. DHCC has also allowed and encouraged us to develop research programs looking at genetic conditions that the UAE and the UK share, such as diabetes, which demands further action to prevent, to treat and to understand. We now look to the future and further expansion of our clinical services elsewhere in the UAE, alongside our teaching and research activities.”
Dr. Sehamuddin Galadari, Chairperson of DHCA’s Research & Education Committee, commented “Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai’s presence is testament to DHCC’s ability to attract top providers to Dubai, and we would like to thank the management team and staff for their support and collaboration. We are very proud of the eye hospital’s efforts in the area of research and training and wish them continued success in the region.” Dr Galadari is a member of the DHCA Board of Directors and a renowned advocate of medical education, training and research.
HRH Princess Haya also toured the purpose-designed and built hospital and inspected the world class facilities.
Moorfields has treated more than 20,000 patients since opening in Dubai, in 2007.
Issued on behalf of MEHD by WPR.
Media Contact:
Jonathan Walsh
WPR
Dubai
Tel: 050 4588610
Email: jon@wprme.com

Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai appoints new Medical Director

[:en]1 November 2012 (Dubai, United Arab Emirates): Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai, the first overseas  branch of the world-renowned London eye hospital, has announced the appointment of Dr Clare Roberts MA (Cantab), BM BCh (Oxon), FRCOphth as the hospital’s new Medical Director. Dr Roberts, who trained at Moorfields London, joined the Dubai hospital in 2010 as Consultant Paediatric Ophthalmologist and Strabismus Surgeon. She assumes the role of Medical Director following the return to Moorfields London of Dr Chris Canning, who held the positions of CEO and Medical Director from the establishment of the hospital in 2006. Many of the hospital’s consultants are Moorfields London trained and all are based permanently in the UAE.
Dr Roberts is an experienced consultant ophthalmologist specialising in the assessment and management of children with eye problems, as well as the management of adults with strabismus (crossed eye). She studied medicine both at Cambridge and Oxford University and trained in the UK, acquiring the Fellowship of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists, and completing her subspecialty training in paediatric ophthalmology and strabismus at Moorfields London. Prior to joining Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai, Dr Roberts was a consultant at Imperial College NHS Trust in London, where she managed a large paediatric ophthalmology service including screening and treatment for retinopathy of prematurity. Dr Roberts has a research interest in amblyopia (lazy eye) and retinopathy of prematurity and has published work in paediatric ophthalmology and strabismus.
Commenting on the appointment, Mariano Gonzalez, who was recently appointed Managing Director at Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai, said: “Dr Roberts has been a highly valued member of the team of consultants at Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai since 2010 and will provide an important point of continuity in Dubai. Her credentials are outstanding and she has the Moorfields London training that we value so highly, as well as the world class skills that have benefited the community and especially the children that we treat at the hospital. We congratulate her on this new appointment and have every confidence that she will continue to ably demonstrate the leadership qualities that will be important as the hospital expands and develops in the UAE.”
Issued on behalf of MEHD by WPR.
Media Contact:
Jonathan Walsh
WPR
Dubai
Tel: 050 4588610
Email: jon@wprme.com

Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai unlocks the secrets to younger eyes this summer

[:en]2 June 2013 (Dubai, United Arab Emirates): Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and when it comes to anti-aging, cosmetic facial surgery around the eyes (‘periorbital rejuvenation’ as it is known to the experts) is the most common procedure. But results can be erratic with low patient satisfaction.  The best results are achieved when patients are operated on by Oculoplastic Surgeons who regularly operate on the eyelid and periorbital region, say the Consultant Oculoplastic Surgeons at Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai, the first overseas branch of the world renowned Moorfields Eye Hospital in London.
The most common procedure in facial cosmetic surgery is performed on the upper and lower eyelids – ‘blepharoplasty’. Around 250,000 procedures are performed every year around the world. However, whilst it is a common procedure, the results can vary significantly from patient expectations.   “Traditional Blepharoplasty has an enormous potential for disaster,” says Dr Andrea Sciscio, Consultant Oculoplastic Surgeon at Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai. “There is no perfect aesthetic procedure and it is very much a case of understanding each patient’s exact problem and address it accordingly.”
Blepharoplasty has evolved enormously since it was first developed 70 years ago.  Over the decades, the techniques have developed to yield the best aesthetic outcome for each patient individually. The eyelids have to be evaluated in the context of the eyebrow and the mid-face appearance – its overall ‘height’ and structure, adds Dr Qasiem Nasser, Consultant Oculoplastic Surgeon at Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai: “An analysis of the soft tissues from the eyebrows to the mid-face, and from the surface to the deeper structures up to the orbital rim (eye socket and surrounding structure), allows the surgeon to establish the aging changes that have occurred with the patient and helps direct the blepharoplasty surgery to deliver the optimal aesthetic outcome.”

From June-August 2013, Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai is offering a special summer rate on consultations for aesthetic eye surgery.

Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai first colour vision study of the UAE’s diabetic population shows that ‘colour blindness’ is not a black and white issue

[:en]
10 June 2013 (Dubai, United Arab Emirates):  Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai has revealed some of the findings of its first UAE colour vison study, undertaken by specialists from the hospital amongst people with diabetes in the UAE population. One of the unexpected findings was that significant colour vision defects were revealed in the vast majority of the tested Emirati population, which includes local people with and without diabetes. The general causes of ‘colour blindness’ (colour vision defects) are well known but the Moorfields study findings need more research to asses whether this UAE revelation is due to genetic or acquired factors (such as excessive exposure to sunlight or Vitamin D deficiency), according to the team at Moorfields.
What is commonly referred to as ‘colour blindness’ is not blindness at all but rather a colour vision deficiency – an inability or decreased ability to see colour or perceive colour differences under normal lighting conditions.
The first scientific paper on colour ‘blindness’ was published by an English chemist – John Dalton – in 1798, when he realised that he was colour blind. The paper was titled ‘Extraordinary facts relating to the vision of colours’.
Color blindness affects a significant number of people and especially isolated communities with a restricted gene pool. More than 95 percent of all variations in human colour vision involve the red and green receptors in male eyes and it is very rare for males or females to be ‘blind’ to the blue end of the spectrum.
An Ishihara colour test consisting of a series of pictures of coloured spots, is the test most often used to diagnose red–green colour deficiencies, with a shape or number embedded in the picture and which can be seen with normal colour vision but not with a colour defect.
The cause of colour blindness is now well known and understood and is related to a fault in the development of one or more sets of retinal ‘cones’ that perceive colour in light and transmit that information to the optic nerve. It is more common amongst men than women because it is linked to the genes, although eye or brain damage can also produce similar symptoms.
‘Colour blindness’ can be stationary or progressive in nature and can be linked to other eye conditions such as age related macular degeneration. It can be total (much less common) or partial and there are two major types of colour blindness: difficulty distinguishing between red and green, difficulty distinguishing between blue and yellow. Around 8 percent of males but only 0.5 percent of females are colour blind in some way or another.
One of the Moorfields researchers, Dr Imran Ansari – an Ophthalmologist at Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai – comments: “There are different forms of ‘colour blindness’ which may have a variety of long term lifestyle implications as there is no cure. The condition may be acquired or inherited (congenital). It is usually classed as a mild disability and whilst it can be debilitating to some degree, there are also some situations where it can actually be an advantage, such as penetrating certain colour camouflages. Of course, there are some occupations in which ‘colour blindness’ is a distinct disadvantage, where recognising colour codes could be an important safety factor, such as when driving cars or flying aircraft, for example.”

Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai supports 15th Emirates Ophthalmology Congress in Dubai (12-14 December 2013) with the participation of leading consultants

[:en]10 December 2013 (Dubai, United Arab Emirates): Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai (Moorfields) will support the 15th Emirates Ophthalmology Congress in Dubai, with the active participation of some of its leading consultants who will moderate and present at the event. The annual congress will focus on updates and innovations in ophthalmology and will attract the leading practitioners in the field from the UAE, Middle East and other countries, including the full 10-strong team of ophthalmology consultants and other members of the clinical team at Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai.
The 2013 Emirates Ophthalmology Congress meeting will be a forum for the latest advances, reviews of current theory and practice, and hands-on problem-based learning. Participants will gain insights into the most effective advances in the diagnosis and management of eye disease and prevention of blindness. Subspecialty sessions will cover the topics of Retina, Glaucoma, Cataract and Refractive surgery. A comprehensive poster program will be featured and will be digitally available at all times.
Dr Avinash Gurbaxani, Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon in Uveitis and Medical Retinal Diseases at Moorfields, will speak at the symposium on ‘the micro biome and auto immune disease’ – a relatively new concept which explores the complex relationship between the vast amount of bacteria that inhabit the human body and their interaction with our genes and immune system.
Dr Edoardo Zinicola, Consultant Ophthalmologist at Moorfields, will moderate the Retina session and also present on Central Retinal Vein Occlusion.
Dr Qasiem Nasser, Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon and Oculoplastics Specialist at Moorfields, will speak about the oculoplastic surgical evaluation of the upper eyelid.
According to Dr Nasser, the most common procedure in facial cosmetic surgery is performed on the upper and lower eyelids – ‘blepharoplasty’. Around 250,000 procedures are performed every year around the world. However, whilst it is a common procedure, the results can vary significantly from patient expectations. “Traditional Blepharoplasty has an enormous potential for disaster. There is no perfect aesthetic procedure and it is very much a case of understanding each patient’s exact problem and addressing it accordingly.”

Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai supports Dubai Healthcare City’s ‘World Diabetes Day campaign’, a public health screening event offering more than 10 tests for children and adults

[:en]Vision experts will provide complimentary consultations to explain some of the most common and serious complications of diabetes
12 November 2014 (Dubai, United Arab Emirates): To mark World Diabetes Day 2014, Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai will support Dubai Healthcare City’s public health screening campaign aimed to educate the community about diabetes through consultations and health checks.
The event, organized by DHCC, the world’s largest healthcare free zone, will take place on Thursday, November 13, 4pm-8pm, at The Executive Towers, Business Bay, Dubai. A team from the hospital will provide residents seeking consultations with medical history review, intra-ocular pressure tests, visual acuity checks, and retinal imaging. The vision tests will use state-of-the-art technology.
Retinal diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy, are some of the most common complications caused by diabetes and can lead to permanent loss of vision if not treated. To help the UAE’s large population of people with diabetes manage the disease, Moorfields has established a specialist team of three retinal consultant surgeons and ophthalmologists in Dubai focusing on medical retinal diseases, such as diabetes. Dr. Avinash Gurbaxani, Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon at Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai, comments: “Vision-related problems are some of the most common and serious complications of diabetes. Of course, the single most effective treatment for diabetic eye disease is prevention – good control of diabetes and any associated high blood pressure can delay or avoid significant eye problems. Prevention of diabetic eye disease starts with regular eye examinations which can so often provide an indicator of the diabetes or blood pressure control. Regular screening should begin from an early age, regardless of whether there are vision symptoms or not.”
Diabetic retinopathy
Every cell in the eye (and, indeed, the body) is affected by the biochemical changes of diabetes. In practice, however, retinopathy is a disease of blood vessels – sometimes they wither away, sometimes they leak fluids when they shouldn’t and sometimes they grow where they do not belong. The blood vessels in the retina are uniquely prone to going wrong in this way, although the same changes can be found elsewhere in the body.
Treating diabetic retinopathy
According to Dr Edoardo Zinicola, Consultant Vitreoretinal Surgeon and Medical Retina Specialist at Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai, once retinopathy is present, direct eye treatment may be needed and the type of treatment depends on the problem. “There is no effective treatment for the parts of the retina where blood vessels have disappeared,” he comments. “Laser photocoagulation remains the first line of treatment for both new and leaking vessels. Injections of steroids and medicines known as VEGF blocking agents also have a role and where the eye disease is advanced then surgery can help.”
Prevention tips for patients at risk of diabetic retinopathy

  • Control the diabetes as well as you can
  • Control high blood pressure
  • Do not smoke
  • Get regular eye checks
  • Take charge of your own health

The Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai specialist team of retinal consultant surgeons and ophthalmologists comprises: Dr Avinash Gurbaxani; Dr Edoardo Zinicola; Dr Jana Sheqem.

Paediatric Strabismus

Facts

A squint is a condition where your eyes look in different directions. One eye turns inwards, outwards, upwards or downwards while the other eye looks forwards. The medical name for a squint is strabismus.

The misalignment of the eyes can be caused by different factors. It can be an early developmental problem where the brain struggles to identify that the two eyes should work as a pair. It can be caused by an abnormality with the eye muscles or an uncorrected vision problem, such as myopia (shortsighted), hypermetropia (longsighted) or Astigmatism.

When to see a doctor?

Squints in children are relatively common. They usually develop before a child is five years of age, but they can appear later.

Up to around three months of age, many babies occasionally squint as their vision develops. This is normal and nothing to worry about. If your child still has a squint after this age, you should visit your Doctor. It is very important that a squint is picked up and treated as early as possible to avoid vision problems developing. If a squint is identified when a child is young, there is a good chance that it will be successfully treated.

Can adults get a squint?

Occasionally, squints that have been corrected during childhood reappear in adulthood. New squints in adults, without any history of a squint in childhood, can be caused by problems with the ocular muscles and/or the eye movement system. You should visit your Doctor as soon as possible if you develop a new squint. They should refer you to an ophthalmologist who will carry out an examination to identify the cause.

Squints that affect adults may cause double vision because the brain has been trained to collect images from both eyes. Squints may also cause a cosmetic problem in adults; in such cases, the appearance of a squint can lead to low self-esteem

What is Amblyopia?

Amblyopia is also known as a ‘lazy eye’. Amblyopia is an early childhood condition where a child’s eyesight in one eye does not develop as it should. The problem is usually in just one eye, but can sometimes affect both of them. Amblyopia affects approximately 2% of children.

When a patient has amblyopia the brain focuses on one eye more than the other, virtually ignoring the ‘lazy eye’. If that eye is not stimulated properly the visual brain cells do not mature normally.

What causes a ‘lazy eye’?

Anything that interferes with clear vision in either eye during the critical period (birth to 6 years of age) can cause amblyopia. The most common causes of amblyopia are constant strabismus (constant turn of one eye), anisometropia (different vision/prescriptions in each eye), and/or obstruction of an eye due to cataract, trauma, lid droop, etc.

Why does my child need to wear a patch?

Occlusion (patching) is used to make a lazy eye work on its own and so improve the vision by encouraging the development of the nerve pathways from that eye to the brain. The patch is worn over the good eye and the amount of time the patch must be worn is decided by the Orthoptist/Ophthalmologist and relates to the extent of the visual problem. If patching is implemented early on, a good level of vision can be achieved. When patching is started in an older child, it is more difficult to achieve good vision.

What is an Orthoptist?

An Orthoptist specialises in diagnosing and treating visual problems involving eye movement and alignment.

The Orthoptist at Moorfields Dubai provides clinical support to all the specialist services at the hospital. She sees both adults and children who have strabismus (a squint), disorders of eye movements, or binocular vision.

What is an Optician?

An Optician will see adults and children for refraction; with this assessment, an optometrist can determine the optical power of the eye, the presence of any “refractive” error that requires spectacle correction, and the best vision that an eye can achieve with an appropriate correction. Younger children have drops to make the pupil (the dark center of the eye) larger and this makes the test more accurate.

What is an Ophthalmologist?

An Ophthalmologist is a specialist in medical and surgical eye problems. Since ophthalmologists perform operations on eyes, they are considered to be both surgical and medical specialists. They will check both the structure and health of the eye. They will make the final decision on the management and will do any surgical procedures required.

Lacrimal Probing in Children

The tear duct is a channel/passage which runs from a tiny opening in the medial lids through the bone to the inside of the nose, and drains the tears and mucus the eye produces. It should open just before or just after birth but sometimes remains blocked for a considerable time after that, causing watering and discharge from the eye. It is harmless, and does not affect the health of the eye or the vision, although it can make the eyelids red and sore and slightly increases the frequency of infective conjunctivitis.

Keratoconus

Keratoconus is a progressive thinning of the cornea. The cornea is the clear front window of the eye, which, along with the intra-ocular lens, focuses light on to the retina. The cornea normally is a smooth, round dome-shaped structure; however in keratoconus it becomes very thin and irregular and it starts to protrude from the centre or below the centre like a cone. This causes blurry vision that is often not completely correctable with glasses.
The disease is multifactorial in origin but there is a strong genetic component which makes it more frequent in certain parts of the world or within certain families.